Who is the mad woman?

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 “A man’s face is his autobiography. A woman’s face is her work of fiction.” Oscar Wilde


I’m sure some curiosity is stirring about the person behind the blog. I use to be completely normal. That statement seems funny now, because I am a new normal. So how is it normal isn’t the same now? Now I’ve learned to embrace my genetic flaws. Society would probably never labeled me as normal, society puts labels on mental disorders such as crazy, depressed, or sickness. The doctors over the years have added labels such as Bipolar disorder, General anxiety disorder (GAD), post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and Depression. Overtime I’ll share the stories behind the labels. Life happened and my brain just stopped making certain chemicals and wasn’t able to deal with trauma or stress. The big label is Bipolar disorder. In combination, I am a physiological mess and a real pain in the ass to treat. Treating bipolar takes priority, because the medication for others can create chaos, mania, and manic episodes. On occasion my doctor will give me something to help with the others, but with mania and depression under control I maintain the quirky new normal. I started a blog to share how it’s not crazy. I share my ups and downs, stories that somehow pop in my head, and if you’re lucky occasionally lunacy, drunken rantings, and delusions. I write those just before the fast acting antipsychotics start working. 
I can be very normal in appearance. It is exhausting when I have fake it all day. Those around me may never know that I suffer a daily battle in my head. I hid the deep depression as the flu for years, but rarely could I hide my mania or psychosis. I know some old friends and acquaintances are reading this right now thinking, “I KNEW IT!” In reality, I hear the whispers and for whatever reason someone always unbeknownst to them remind me how people love to talk and gossip, It’s human nature. They talk about my “illness.” I never confronted them and they never knew they hurt me so deeply when all I needed was help, friendship, and acceptance. Being bipolar is unfortunately very lonely and you hurt the people you love most, you hurt yourself. So I became very open and own my “sickness” instead of fueling speculation. 
I’m not sick, I am bipolar. I am very intelligent, some may say gifted and very artistic. I can remember the placement of every object in my house, even junk drawers, a convenient superpower. I’m generous to the point of giving what I do not have to give. I have an almost obsessive need to learn talents and skills. I absorb things and like to be independent. I start hobbies or even sports at random. Once I’m satisfied with mastering the activity I move on to another. Over the years I’ve become like a human Google of useless information and skills. My daughter asked me just yesterday, “Mom, how do know everything?” My response, “Because I’m bipolar.” I realized I didn’t say sick, crazy, or just because, I said bipolar, It’s my superpower. It’s never going away and makes me the person I am today. 
So that doesn’t sound bad at all, does it? Let me share some demons. I’ll only share a few but you’ll get the point. When manic, I am reckless, sexy, and entertaining. I am a child with no rules. I do what makes me feel good. I don’t think about others emotions. I lash out at those who try to help. The racing thoughts and rapid speech are the first sign of  my mania. I will ramble my theories and musing, draw my thoughts on paper. I have visions and see things that aren’t real. The night sky is colorful, It’s absolutely beautiful with color. The moon hums to me. I refuse to sleep because I’m not tired. I have no need for sleep anymore. I’m delusional and will recount a story from a book as my own and truly believe the storytelling. I’m extremely compulsive in all areas. I am self-destructive physically. It’s never a happy ending, the cycle concludes with me crying for days, depressed, guilt ridden, hurt, embarrassed, suicidal, and no way to explain my behavior. Sometimes I feel like it wasn’t me, but this other person who ruined my reputation. If only I could stop this identity thief who used my body and mind. I am reminded by the scars and the scars I’ve caused others. I swear to give everything I’ve got to redeem my soul as I cry in bed begging to be normal.
Now here’s the catch, I miss my delusional mind. Yes, I miss the sensations and delusions. I was invincible, I had no fears or worries, no sadness in my world. I miss the colors of the night sky. I’ve never seen the Aurora Borealis, but it’s close to how I saw the night. Sometimes, the humming that radiated from the moon would cause it all to flow in perfect sync. On full moons, it was the strongest, hence I was a lunatic. Sometimes so strong it would draw me out of my house and keep me from self-destruction because I would sit out all night under the stars. I never understood why everyone wasn’t staring at the sky. I miss seeing such beauty. I gave up my colorful night to be normal. Sometimes I will try hard to see it and cry because my night was no longer colorful, It’s dark now, it’s normal. I gave it up to be a better mother. To be an example to my children and friends. I gave it up to save my life. My days are now colorful.
I’m a normal, sometimes a bit more extreme almost childish parent. We all like to win and screaming, “boo yah” to a group of kindergartens when winning a game is my normal and they love seeing me being one of the kids. I’m the cool fun mom who is coloring the wall. I’m goofy and tell the kids fantastic stories. I give the pets voices and narrate what the pets are thinking in those voices. I have an ongoing saga with the cat that even causes me to laugh aloud. My husband is my best friend and incredibly strong to have stuck around for 18 years caring for me. It’s not easy being a caregiver to someone who fights you daily at times. I have led charitable and professional organizations successfully. I am able to volunteer for organizations and even maintain a pretty impressive resume. I may be a pack rat and sometimes a complete disaster. I am flattered by the response to my blog and just knowing I’ve helped one person heals my scars. I hope if a story touches you that you share it so it helps someone else. It was medication and good doctors that helped me, also reading other blogs and seeing others surviving that really helped me. You’re not alone even when you feel there is no way anyone feels the way you do, I guarantee you there is a post not far down the feed to prove you wrong.

Synopsis: in case you have an attention disorder and can’t finish the whole story.

I am here today, I’m pretty damn cool and I am bipolar. 

 
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About Musings of a mad woman

“Mental labels don’t define who I am, time and aging only gets me closer to those I love, will love, and have loved” ~ S.L. Cato I’ve battle Bipolar disorder for at least 15+ years, toss in a couple more labels I’ve collected such as generalized anxiety disorder PTSD. This battle is pretty amazing and out of this world and at times a dark rollercoaster ride. The medication, the manic episodes, and mania can be pretty humorous. The hypersexuality, drugs, anxiety, depression, ghosts, and parenting. I’ve certainly felt the sting of the “crazy” stigma, but I’m here today. Bipolar is my superpower. I hope by sharing my musings it helps others understand the labels situation whispered behind closed doors. Please feel free to share my stories, rantings and musings. Read more about me in my post "Who is the Mad Woman"

116 responses »

  1. I always love all of your posts and your blog. I have nominated you for “The Versatile Blogger Award” because you are so awesome!!! Here is my link to that post…. https://myloudbipolarwhispers.com/2017/04/12/i-am-very-honored-to-be-nominated-for-the-versatile-blogger-award/ Please complete the 5 rules as soon as you get a chance. I am eager to see your responses and nominees. Hugs and blessings to you always and forever.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I see you are following my “Delight in Disorder” blog. Great! Thanks.
    I have just moved my blog within the website, “Delight in Disorder: Faith & Mental Illness” (delightindisorder.org) I hope you’ll join me there. You can subscribe on the left sidebar under the heading, “More Delight.”
    Blessings,
    Tony

    Like

  3. I want chicken, baked with lemon, dripping with steaming juices – and fresh strawberries, lots of fresh strawberries. And coffee, hot and black, with honey, and a sprig of rosemary. Then, in jaunty shorts and my old straw hat, with it’s newly braided hatband, to walk the dogs, crunching through the first of the fallen leaves of the end of summer, smelling old straw together with new lovely leather. I’m seeing swirling spirals and tasting geometry. Feels like it’s bound to be a good day. I’ll make it so. Music is welling up within me, and it’s making me all kinds of hungry. Thanks for your words, and perspicacity.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thanks for the follow and allowing me to discover your wonderful site. I like the honesty of your writing. I’ve suffered with clinical depression since I was a child and, after thirty-odd years, I am finally at peace with it (I think.) On the whole I’m glad I went through the hell because it’s shown me the other side of life, the dark side where my creativity comes from. Look forward to reading more of your posts.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Reblogged this on Musings of a mad woman and commented:

    So for several months I’ve written here and there and neglected my blog and my apologies. It has been heartwarming that many followers reached out to checkup on me and I can assure you I am doing very well. I hope to write a bit more about that soon and get back to my blog. For those new to my blog….well this was my first intro, I really don’t hold back and I’m always open about mental health so if you know me in real life feel free to ask me anything or even here or my Facebook book page for blog. I’m an advocate and hate the stigma associated with all mental disorders…..even those I loathe and write about such as my narcissistic cat.
    Speaking of the cat, she just pour water on my Ipad…. just walked right up and hit my cup. Perfect timing for this reblog and reintroduction. 🙂

    Like

  6. Wow now that I am finding more people, such as you, that have the same “crazy” in them as me I feel so un-normally normal!! We are like our own special crowd, and that’s no delusion 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Hi lovely to meet you. I found you through Paul’s Especially epic award for epic awesomeness x Congrats on your award.- love you Oscar Wilde quote. My hubby-to -be found me a book of all his quotations from his plays and novels. What a man!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Howdy excellent blog! Does running a blog like this require a large amount of work? I have absolutely no knowledge of programming but I had been hoping to start my own blog in the near future. Anyways, should you have any suggestions or tips for new blog owners please share. I know this is off topic nevertheless I simply needed to ask. Thank you!|

    Liked by 1 person

  9. First of all: You are awesome. 🙂
    You kept my attention – even if I have ADD I read the whole thing (had to giggle when I read the attention thing at at the end though)
    I can relate to several things you wrote, like “I have an almost obsessive need to learn talents and skills. I absorb things and like to be independent. I start hobbies or even sports at random. Once I’m satisfied with mastering the activity I move on to another. Over the years I’ve become like a human Google of useless information and skills. ” I thought YES YES YES, me too. And I feel like I have to keep up a lot of things too, just because I have spent time and money on them while being obsessed…
    I feel inspired by reading your blog, so thanks for visiting mine and liking my post:)

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Thanks for sharing your story and feelings. I had seen reports that a larger percentage of very successful and creative people are bi-polar (than in general society) and you shared the reasons why. First timer here, courtesy of Rob’s repost. Keith

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Your writing is much more than mere coins to me, though I understand the longing for true community that was expressed by one of the commenters above. You express in words what is terribly difficult to even feel, much less to put down on paper (or on a screen) – thank you. My diagnoses are different but much of what you describe is so relatable to me. I’m very glad that I stumbled upon your blog. Keep pushing forward, as will I.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Thanks for liking my blog posts as that has led me to your blog which I am finding insightful.

    My Dad is Bipolar I as well. Currently, his manic phases are just plain destructive. It is hard to see him suffer in depression but get in equal and opposite amounts of trouble on the opposite end of the spectrum. He managed for years on his meds and then they just stopped working.

    Thanks again for writing!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Wow, thank you for this incredible post. Are you a synesthete as well as being bipolar? The memory phenomenon is something I have not heard of before. There are some articles suggesting that memory is often impaired in bipolar individuals. Like this:

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/bipolar-you/201412/cognitive-deficit-in-bipolar-disorder

    But you don’t feel that?

    It is also interesting that all of the labels doctors have given you contain the word “disorder”. Seems like a bad idea to label people with that word. It is just the way you are, not a “disorder”.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s a pretty neat skill to remember placements of things but synesthete, Isn’t that something we all have to a degree? And yes, disorder is used far to much. I embrace it as a gift. Thank you for reading 🙂

      Like

  14. “New Normal”… that’s what I used to call my fully medicated state. But then I lost my job (and with it all of my health care [this was pre-Obamacare] ) and became floridly psychotic from the withdrawal of the drug. It woke me up, because that is what psychosis and all these conditions of the psyche are supposed to WAKE UP. It is not illness it is psychic process of transcendence.

    I discovered themes to my psychosis, anxiety, PTSD, and OCD and realized it was not a broken brain syndrome that I had embraced and proselytized with no pay from the drug companies. I discovered quite the opposite, that is a spiritual process (any psychic crisis is [the very word psyche comes from the ancient Greek and means ‘SOUL’). I began a five year journey to discover if my condition was permanent and whether the drugs for life edict was true. I found countless stories of recovery from very severe “mental illnesses” from and about people who did not follow the medical model or take drugs, but totally resolved.

    I see in your posts a fire and passion, a brilliant spark of the Divine, the feminine aspect. I want to share something with you that I think may help you, it is a link to a youtube channel called “am I bipolar or waking up?” It’s from a fellow named Sean Blackwell. Please watch the videos, this is not a sales pitch, this is path forward. Stay on your drugs, but look into this :

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLAAIgB7Facm7YaKaI28y6A

    It helped me although I was labeled schizophrenic.

    Liked by 1 person

      • Your husband is very lucky, I think he knows it, even if it is a chore keeping up with you. Be kind to him, some times we men don’t understand important stuff until it is too late.Wish you good luck.

        Liked by 1 person

          • All the praise of this toneless place, counts as coins, those you live with and respond with are so much more rich than this. All we can give you are words in reply, those you live with can give you life or death. Communication and communion is that vital, especially to us that are hungry beyond words. Maybe your hanging ape is enough for the faithful, I doubt it is for the system of the down. Maybe lovers are all we have left in this displacement.

            Liked by 1 person

            • True, Maybe it’s the opposite. Toneless is vague, I feel I offer more than coins, if you open your mind. My words are there and coins placed in my writings for those who need them.
              I do think my writing reaches you more. I can see you understand other aspects and I appreciate the intellect.

              Like

  15. I absolutely loved this!! As someone who struggles
    With ptsd, anxiety, depression and so much more it’s so nice to read some one on here who is coming as far as you have and has there family standing beside them. You sound like such an amazing person and outgoing and I love how you don’t say it like its some disease the way others make it seem.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I could so easily of written that, maybe the ‘normal’ folk just want a touch of special like we have while we are so busy hankering after the norm. Roll with the crazy as I like to call it. Really enjoying reading your blog. Excellent stuff.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I love your writing style! I’m at a time in life where I’m beginning to realise a lot of thoughts and feelings I’ve battled with for years aren’t odd or abnormal at all. The scary thing is just how common they are.

    We’ve all got a place in this world and despite the challenges difference may bring to each and every one of us it ensures that the world will never ever be drab and boring.

    Keep up the blogging and stay frosty!

    Davey x

    Liked by 1 person

  18. My newest saying for myself is “It is not the quantity of life, it is the quality! Normal scares me for the thought of this flat line, I’ve been feeling, is what I THINK normal is…..I miss my *fun* self. Shhh…I also *kinda* miss the darkness that would blacken my soul from any light. (most creative times…and yes it was/is like ‘someone’ else…)

    Thank you for sharing this with everyone. I’m slowly coming out of the closet w/my disorder and branching out as to it’s for those of us that do have our faculties (as it is) to help those of the ones suffering mental illness that can not speak for themselves. When we have a passion in our life (which one NEED be found…like your multiple quests of more knowledge—as I seek also) it also gives us a found motivation and drive we might not otherwise have.

    I was locked up in my room until about 34 (my divorce –which i wanted) hidden away w/my disorders. Time to stir things up a little & be MYSELF!!

    Much Love to you & your plights…You can do this…WE can do this 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Thank you for the like on my post firstly. It is also very humbling to see your struggle even if I have been on the receiving end of a bipolar partner. Seeing what the medication can do to a person and the staggering highs and incredible lows it can create without them. I think I understand a little better now what she went through and feel bad for not doing more for her, feeling I could, nay should, have done more to help. She seems happier now though, I was not the one for her.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Such a beautiful post!!! I struggle with depression and anxiety.. So I relate to the “you” after your manic episodes. I’m also a psychology major and find your story not only inspiring but educational. I’m pursuing a career in therapy/counseling and have found that understanding real people and their real struggles have been the best information for treating people with similar problems and disorders, if that makes sense haha. So thanks again for sharing your story with the world!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. I’m sorry, I had to laugh – at myself….I started reading and was really interested then I did that thing of where I was speed reading (in browsing mode) and scrolled to the bottom…..saw your synopsis and chuckled. I must have attention disorder then!
    Thanks for liking my post…you make a good a valid read…*thumbs in air

    Liked by 1 person

  22. bipolar is so easy to say and a simple term. compared to dyshidrotic eczema, syncopal attack and gastroenteritis! Having had to face and alleviate more than two cases of depressions leading to suicidal tendencies. I am open to new terms of biology. Bring it on! Bring out the madness!

    Liked by 1 person

  23. What a sensitive account! Love how you made it into your superpower- it is!
    Somehow studying all the chemicals and neural pathways in understanding this disorder, still doesn’t explain the purpose of it all. Maybe it is destiny, fate, a greater picture than we humans can see.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. You are not just bipolar, you are also beautiful, sweetie! Thanks for the Like on my blog, and don’t stop writing! The world needs more manic musings like yours!

    Liked by 1 person

  25. You are very damn cool. An excellent communicator with a refreshingly honest blog. Obviously a strong woman who should be proud of how you’re handling a difficult condition that our doctors know very little about. The human brain is so insanely complicated that they’re just doing their best with educated guesses.

    What modern medicine knows about the brain is like the tip of a massive iceberg – and that’s only because we’ve learned SO much over the last 10 years than we have in all of human history prior to that – so I’m a big believer in trusting yourself. I know that can be difficult sometimes with mental health issues, but no one knows exactly what you’re going through except you. Even the rare people that actually have empathy & try to use it can only go so far in understanding the insufficient language we are limited to using in trying too articulate what it’s like. Your husband should be commended for not letting anything get in the way of his love for you. That should also tell you something about how wonderful you are because it would be easy for a caregiver to bail, but he sticks it out b/c you’re worth it.
    Keep up the inspiring writing. Keep being you – and embracing who you are – because you are here, you are cool and, if I may be so bold, you’ve got stunningly beautiful eyes to boot. 😉
    Stay strong!
    K.Farris
    PS: forgive me for the writing in this comment. I’m looking through a window on my phone that shows 3 lines & I’m not going back through to edit at 4:20 am. Hopefully there aren’t too many mistakes & I’ve made myself somewhat clear 😉 Take care.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Thank you so much for sharing your experiences and your story. This has given me some insights I’ve never encountered or been given before. I’d say “normal” = acceptance. If we all had enough understanding to become accepting then bipolar would simply be a part of the definition of normal.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Would it matter if I said these are normal human existential conditions? We all have psychotic breaks once in a while. We are all essentially psychotic. The core of human psyche “speaks” in a symbolic language. and behaves differently than does the “conditioned” human shell. The symbolic language – when exposed to outer elements – gets labelled as psychosis. But people with psychosis – with who I have had the honor of working mostly – are not mad. They simply speak a different language. A language that the world once knew, still knows on the deeper level, but has allowed to slip from consciousness.

    To be able to manage these existential human conditions is what is called life.

    It is better to think of humanity a bit quirky rather than believe in the labels that someone else imposes. We are the divine children of immortality. Each one of us. With powers to match. Believe in yourself. That is all that is required.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I really enjoyed you comment, very thought provoking and interesting enough I’ve been reading a lot of interesting articles and books on the subject. Over the years, I’ve blindly stubble from doctor to doctor, but only recently have a begun to view myself differently. I’m not sick, I’m different and have a very special gift. I really hope over time I can help others find themselves and discover it’s not an illness. In psychosis, which I admitted I miss deeply, I saw and felt more alive. If I could learn to control the fall back to earth without dying I’d embrace psychosis. Sadly it’s the fall that kill will kill me if I choose to fly.

      Liked by 2 people

  28. I love this post. I echo so, so many of those thoughts. My favorite line was one I’d never considered: “bipolar is my superpower.” I guess I do see the world a lot differently because of my illness. Maybe that’s not all bad. Thanks for the perspective.

    Liked by 1 person

    • We are all pretty dang cool. I read post all day sometimes from other bipolar or other mental conditions. Just the shear emotion in those post is different than the average blog. We may hurt, but we do it better than anyone else and we can give happy an out of this world meaning. I try to remember not everyone can experience our levels. It’s not alway good, but at least we are living a life no one but those labeled different can experience. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

  29. I am little moved, these days, by most of what I read, but this is of another order: truth is so unexpected, so much a reminder of former paths, and, too, so very harkening, of who (all) we have been, and have tried to be.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Personally I’m not a fan of the word “normal”. It gives the idea that there is a criteria to being normal. If there was I wouldn’t ever meet that criteria, and I don’t know if many would say the same. I love individuality, and think it is highly underrated. But more importantly our brains are all unique and respond to different things in different ways

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Hi there. I have mentioned before I like your blogs. I think I enjoy the freedom you write with and how you express your normal.

    I only understand a little about being bipolar as I shared a studio with a lady artist whoes work was produced in low times and always in black and white. They were large paintings and showed commitment to her chosen bent. I always had to suspend belief when I looked at her work as trying to say its this or its that did not work for me. They were abstract really and the beauty I saw in them was me wondering what she was thinking and saw when painted.

    I am here because I am trying to find out what normal is for me. I have/is/was/may do again suffer with PTSD and just cannot get my old mind set back. I am not sure whether I actually want it back either. I enjoyed my life but as I said my normal ain’t no more. I don’t know whether to just drift along and over time return or whether I should say start again and let go of my ideas of what I thought I was.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for the comment and reading my blog. I like your comment of not being sure you want your old life back because it reminds me of my thoughts. I know am stronger because of my experiences and i am sure you are as well if you haven’t realized it yet. I’ll not get personal about your PTSD, but I can say with time that part of my life has faded. The condemned feelings, anger, terror, while always there is no longer the daily, wake up and immediately think about what is the day going to be like? What if I panic? What if something triggers me? Now it still happens but now I am honest. If I cry at random in a crowded restaurant because I’m overwhelmed, who cares. The people around us have no idea how strong we are and the superpower we have to control ourselves. You are an ambassador to PTSD as I am to mental illness. We are all here to share our stories and I guarantee your stories will help someone survive. Thank you again for liking me 🙂

      Like

  32. I love your honesty which gives me a better idea of a life lived by someone who is bipolar. I grieve for you that you can no longer see the night sky in all its brilliance, but of course, the need to be ‘normal’ requires sacrifices. Thank you for sharing your story. It makes me a better, more compassionate person to read this.

    Liked by 2 people

  33. This post made me have a rush of confidence, Boo Yaa! I have ADD, and I followed everything you said, so let it be known someone who can’t focus correctly found your post interesting to read through it all. This post is probably gonna be one of my favorites from you in a while, simply because it just made me feel like I can do it. What would I be doing? I don’t care, I can do it.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I thought about some of my followers when writing and thought about how I barely had the patience to proof read (I rarely do so Ignore all the typos). It really makes me feel good you follow my thinking and writings. It’s never easy and I don’t want to ever candy coat living with a mental illness, just yesterday I cried…..then I laughed at myself for crying. It’s a very delicate thing and in ways a gift. We feel more than anyone can ever feel, hurt more deeply, and live more vicariously. You probably can think think circles around me.

      Liked by 1 person

  34. My father, born in 1912, was eventually diagnosed as bi-polar after my sister and I had grown up. They had another name for it then. He was a gentle man that did manage to buy some swamp land during a high mood. Not easy for my mother, but I, a little clueless, leaving home at 20 when he was 53, never really noticed much. I have a daughter who is bipolar and is a very special HS teacher. A friend’s favourite teacher was bi-polar. I personally have anger at one end of my mood swings that causes me to lash out verbally. At 71 I’ve learned to mellow a little… Too important not to when one wants to maintain good relations with kids and grandkids.
    We have a grandson who is on the ASD spectrum. A talented animator, he taught us to look at the world in a totally different way and appreciate him for what he has done to enrich our lives and help us appreciate diversity – and eschew the word, normal.

    Liked by 2 people

  35. Pingback: Who is the mad woman? – Invisble girl

  36. The best way to see that beauty again, look at your kids. Look at your husband. Look at the things at make you the happiest. They are your night sky. I love your post. Please, never see yourself as sick or crazy. See yourself as a superhero. That is what many people probably see you as. Including myself.

    Liked by 2 people

  37. ” I gave up my colorful night to be normal. Sometimes I will try hard to see it and cry because my night was no longer colorful, It’s dark now, it’s normal.”

    I connect to these words so much here.

    Oh, how I miss the moon *sigh*

    M x

    Liked by 2 people

    • I loved that part too! She sounds like a wonderful person to me, after all who wants to be normal if it isn’t fun? Normal can be fun too, and for that maybe we must redefine normal to suit our own definition of normal.

      Liked by 1 person

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